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May 29, 2023Liked by Jeffery Saddoris

Is the "I hate all of this" feeling the precursor to creating something new? Sometimes for me that exasperated, constricted, frustrated feeling means I'm ready for exploring new ideas, techniques or spaces.

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Maybe. I've got a few things I'm noodling on. I think one of the things that brought it on is that I'm at the point of having to get the work out in the world in one form or another and am not quite sure what that looks like. Originals? Prints? Sets of prints? I'm great at the ideas and the actual making, but I'm fairly rubbish at the selling and getting it out there. :)

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Great piece of writing Jefferey. Loved the Floyd ref in your title too.

Common threads and connective tissue might be for history to perceive, rather than for the artist to worry much about? You’re just the conduit, producing something that only you can.

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Thank you, Cams. I think you could be right, but I like to think that the work is going somewhere and I'd like to be able to follow some sort of creative continuum.

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I have lost not necessarily my faith in my work, but the enthusiasm in pursuing certain projects. I am a photographer, and if I had to look for a reason for this (external reason, mind) it would be the ridiculous amount of bad and/or meaningless photography I am subjected to every day, on social media and occasionally in real life (exhibitions, workshops and the lot). Add to this the was art becomes increasingly relativized by the AI storm, and you have a pretty solid answer. How do I get back to work? I read art essays, I go back to my notebooks, I watch videos or movies that revolve around the theme of creativity and introspection. I am also aware that the ups and downs are normal steps of a regular life pattern, and I try to remember that being creative doesn't imply being prolific.

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I couldn't agree more and the whole AI thing really has me on edge. I think there will always be a market for "hand made" goods, but as it gets harder and harder to tell what's what, the average person will have a much more difficult time seeing the difference.

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Yeah, it worries me as well. Being in the construction industry, my career is fairly well shielded. But for my kids, my current plan is to encourage them to avoid betting on "making it" in the "high" arts. Instead they should look for opportunities to be a direct-service provider. For example, if my daughter wanted to be a visual artist, I'd push her to do that AND get education credentials to be a art teacher (or graphic design, etc).

I guess it's like telling a kid that is very good at Basketball that they need to have a backup plan. For the .00001% that makes it to the top, it's amazing. But it's brutal on anyone that don't get there. I fear AI is going to make a lot of creative professions a similar all or nothing profession. (Then again, the trope of the starving artist has always been a part of our culture....)

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May 29, 2023Liked by Jeffery Saddoris

When was working on my grad school thesis, it felt that the previous three years led to that specific project. I'm not sure if that was "true" or if it was merely an overactive imagination drawing connections cause that's what human brains do.

As for my (non-architecture) work after college, I'm not sure. I see a dilettante who tries a lot of different things. I can't say anything I do is great, but I enjoy the process....and since my day job covers the bills and then some, I guess that's OK.

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Yes! I feel the same way, Justus, and I would add that I don't feel "called" to do any of it. I enjoy it, but I could also get a "regular" job tomorrow, dump all of the creative pursuits, and never look back. I would just make things here and there for me. I actually may be pretty close to doing just that.

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May 30, 2023Liked by Jeffery Saddoris

I’d hate for you to cut back on what you do...but given that’s the path I’ve chosen for myself I can’t argue against it. There’s a lot less stress in making art if one doesn’t need it for daily sustenance. On the other hand, maybe that need is the edge that distinguishes the good and great from merely mediocre.

Then again is crossing that barrier worth the stress? Greatness often exacts a terrible price in those who pursue it.

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Isn't this really about you getting comfortable about the way you create work? Not the way you think you're supposed to create work. Or the way other people create work. But the way that actually works for you. Accepting yourself can set you free by getting you out of your own way.

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